The PlayStation exclusives we’d love to see on PC

The PlayStation exclusives we’d love to see on PC

There are rumours that robo-dinosaur hunting adventure Horizon: Zero Dawn is coming to PC soon, which would be the first time a game produced by a Sony-owned studio has shaken loose from its console shackles. We’ve also seen other former PlayStation exclusives developed by third-party studios make the leap to PC in the past year, such as Journey and Detroit: Become Human, and 2020 will see the release of Death Stranding.
If Sony are looking to follow in Microsoft’s footsteps by making the PC their second home, then that’s good news for us. It begs the question: what current PlayStation exclusive games do we crave most urgently?
No, PlayStation Now doesn’t count.
Ratchet & Clank

Alice Bee: I was 12 when the first Ratchet & Clank came out, and I think it was the first action platformer I ever played. How spoiled I was! It played a pretty big role in my childhood, as me and my younger brother took turns bouncing around all the different planets, squabbling and telling each other what to do. The 2016 reimagining was subtly different, but broadly just the 2012 game but… better.
Mechanic cat alien Ratchet and tiny intelligent robot pal Clank, they of the determinism most nominative, get caught up in a big space war, and you explore evil factories, tropical islands, big space cities and other sci-fi favourites.
Ratchet and Clank have different abilities, which you expand as you find new weapons and tools. They open up new areas and secrets, so the levels have a bit of a metroidvania flavour, but with big juicy colours the like of a Saturday morning kids’ cartoon. I think the PC audience would eat this up, so I can’t understand why it’s not already in our mouths.
God Of War

Nate: Good old Dad of War. Just like Aloy’s big archery adventure, this was one I played through with my wife (cos that’s what we use the PS4 for), and we got really into it. I know it’s a bit cringe to act like the idea of a big action adventure game with themes of FATHERHOOD and RESPONSIBILITY and ENDING CYCLES OF VIOLENCE is anything groundbreaking or rare. But fuck it, God of War did it really well, and it was a welcome change in a series I’d never touched because it seemed like a teenager’s dick had been allowed to design a game.
And yeah, I get that even this change was less a case of toxic masculinity being defeated forever, and more a reflection of the fact that the cohort of bloodthirsty young white men making games in the mid-2000s are now a cohort of melancholy middle-aged white dads making games. The big takeaway here is that it would be better to have more games – especially “prestige” games – being made by people who aren’t either of those things. But alas, I am a melancholy, middle-aged white dad, and I was a melancholy, middle-aged white dad-to-be when I played God of War. It spoke to me pretty well. And anyway, whether they’re symptoms of over-representation or not, I’m much more keen on protagonists like old, sad, thoughtful-even-if-he’s-self-regarding Kratos, than young, cruel, gurning-as-he-pops-a-boner-and-jabs-out-a-monster’s-eye-with-it Kratos.
There’s lots more to love in this one, too. I was really into GoW’s particular aesthetic take on Norse myth, an area just as overplayed as sad war dads are, and it really reminded me of Age of Mythology, of all things. The weird, alien elves were a treat, I was a big fan of the way each of the nine realms were so visually distinct (although really only four of them saw any game time), and the gigantic friendly snake was an absolute legend. I had all the time in the world for him. Next game in the series to be about the snake, please.
Dreams

Graham: Dreams looks like a technical marvel. It’s the new game from Media Molecule, the makers of Little Big Planet, and it feels like the logical next step. Where LBP gave players the tools to make platformer levels, Dreams gives you a suite of tools to make entire games. That includes scultping models, puppeteering those models to create animations, scripting rules and systems, and constructing your own sound effects and music.
Most importantly, it looks to do all of these things while making the process playful. You’re not just downloading a version of Unity designed to be used with a controller, but a game that aims to make game creation feel as intuitive as sketching with a pencil.
Dreams is due for its full release in February, but has been in early access since last April. In that time, players have already created remarkable things, including a small Metal Gear Solid remake, a Cyberpunk 2077 demake and this ridiculously realistic looking fry-up by John Beech, pictured above.
PC gaming obviously has a long history of user-generated content, and so these tools would feel right at home on PC. In fact, Media Molecule already spoke last year about their desire to allow people who create things with Dreams to export their work to other devices, and suggested there was potential for the whole thing to come to PC. Bring it on.
Shadow Of The Colossus

Nate: My daughter has only recently learned to climb the stairs. It’s a massive endeavour for a one year old, involving loads of panting and ‘hnnnnngh’ noises, and it took her a few abandoned tries to get the hang of it. When she finally made the attempt I knew was going to get her to the top, I put the climbing-the-bosses music from SotC on my phone at full blast. When she made it to the top step, I was very proud, but also having a right laugh. Classic dad chuckles, I know.
But still, the last time I actually saw SotC being played was fifteen years ago, off my gourd and lying on my mate’s sofa as he stabbed a massive, hairy stone eagle (and in the game lol etc). If even the vague idea of a strenuous climb still brings that music to mind, it’s fair to say that was a pretty intense bit of game design. I suppose I’d quite like to have SotC on PC so I could have a go at it myself, but to be honest I’m not sure anything could really beat that first, spectacular meeting.
Marvel’s Spider-Man

Nate: Honestly, I would have been so much happier with Spider-Man if it had been shorter, simpler, and much more linear. Cos it’s not bad, by any means. The web-swinging by which you travelled around the city was one of the most viscerally enjoyable means of getting around I’ve ever experienced in a game. I have a really nice recurring dream where I am able to brachiate around like an ape, and the swinging about in Spider-Man is the nearest I will ever come to making it real unless I become unfeasibly strong.
But oh boy, did this game come with a massive case of open-world fatigue syndrome. I just could not have cared less about fussily seeking out the various icons on the map, and the mental admin burden conferred by getting waylaid by sidequest after sidequest was tiring. There was just so much to deal with: with great power, it turned out, came a little too much responsibility.
Usually it’s at least 20 hours into an open-worlder before the chore of playing it outweighs the novelty involved. But for some reason, even with the fun, fun ropes, I ended up crashing out of this one way sooner. Maybe I got too busy. Maybe I just wasn’t in the mood at the time. Either way, ever since that night when I put it down and never picked it up again, I’ve felt a bit guilty. I feel like I’ve been mean to Spider-Man. And I’m not sure he deserves it. A PC release would be the thing to convince me to take him for another spin. It would certainly give more people the chance to enjoy some superb aerial acrobatics.
Tokyo Jungle

Graham: Tokyo Jungle comes from a time before most of Sony’s exclusive stable turned into prestige dramas about the end of the world. Instead it’s a game about the end of the world in which you can play as a kangaroo and absolutely beast a tiger in the face.
Of course, you can play as lots of other animals too – around 50 in total. Set in a Tokyo where all the humans have disappeared, this is an animal survival game in which you must forage, hunt and eat your way up the food chain in order to survive. You also have to breed with other animals of the same species, ultimately establishing a pack that lets you fell even larger enemies.
I want to stress: I haven’t played Tokyo Jungle. It’s a game that I watched trailers of in the build up to its release, but I didn’t own a PlayStation 3 when it came out. My desire to prompt a giraffe to kick a boar in the face hasn’t diminished in the seven years since, and a PC release would be the perfect opportunity to finally give it a go. Reading just now, via the game’s Wikipedia page, that “Pomeranian dogs are key characters in the story” has only made this urge stronger.
The Last Guardian

Katharine: I wouldn’t say I’m absolutely in love with Team Ico’s soulful action puzzler The Last Guardian, but Trico, the titular giant, feathered cat-dog-thing that fiercely defends your small cursed boy character as you try and make your escape from a mysterious tower, is a technical marvel. The way he moves, stretches and even bristles his feathers is so gosh-darned life-like that you sometimes forget this isn’t a real, breathing animal onscreen.
We didn’t own our two cats at the time I played The Last Guardian, but man alive it’s actually uncanny how cat-like Trico can be at times, the way he limbers up before making a seemingly impossible leap onto the top of a tiny pillar, or cautiously sniffs at things the first time he lays eyes on them. He’s something I’d love to see reborn on PC, with smoother frame rates and animations, and higher quality textures – much like how the wandering wildlife of Red Dead Redemption 2 were spruced up for PC at the end of last year.
Plus, it’s just quite a good adventure game with some neat puzzles, gorgeous set pieces and a genuinely heart-wrenching story. I didn’t really get on much with Ico (too fussy) or Shadow Of The Colossus (too repetitive, yeah I know, fight me), but The Last Guardian was the first Team Ico game I really clicked with, and it would be great to see it get a second wind over on PC. Do it for Trico, Sony.
Bloodborne

Alice0: Probably my favourite FromSoftware game, this one. The city of Yharnham is riddled with a plague of beastblood, so poisoned that even the angry mobs wielding pitchforks and torches are themselves clearly infected. In we go as a hunter on a mysterious mission, cutting through hordes of beasts with our weapons that can transform into new forms. It’s some good Victoriana monsterhuntering, this. The city is eerily familiar to me as a resident of Edinburgh, all weird bridges and tunnels and spires and passages and levels above levels above levels. The wolfmen are wolfy, the hunter fashion tip-top, and my favourite weapon is a gravestone stuck on the end of a sword. Love that gothic horror monsterhunting.
It’s good fightin’. Bloodborne’s violence is built on Dark Souls ideas, with a bloodthirsty twist. Where the correction decision after taking a hit in Dark Souls is often to pull back and heal, Bloodborne will offer a brief window where you can heal by damaging enemies. This opportunity is tantalising, risky, and hugely satisfying. Sekiro would later continue renovating Soulsy combat into a proper great action game but this mid-point suits me well. The ‘trick weapons’ able to transform mid-combo are great fun too, both as a combat tool and a stylistic flair. Snapping the saw cleaver open and closed makes a satisfying threatening clunk and did I mention my favourite weapon is literally a gravestone?
Bloodborne is also some cracking cosmic horror. At a certain point, the veil lifts and you see what’s truly happening in this city. It is proper horrible. The shift still makes me beam when I think about it. It has the usual Soulsy mysteries and hidden stories hinting at something greater, then just WHAM! cosmic horror to the face.
Why do I want Bloodborne to come to PC if I already own it on PS4? Partially because I want PC peeps to enjoy Bloodborne and I want RPS to fill with writing about it. But mostly because my former flatmate took her console with her so I can’t play it anymore.
Uncharted

Alice Bee: I’m cheating here because I have said “Uncharted” and realistically what I am envisaging is “Uncharted: The Full Beans Collection” including all of the games, especially the one where you’re the girls (pictued above).
Uncharted is basically everything I want from a third person adventure game. You leap around pretty maps, do some ancient tomb puzzles, have explosive set pieces against shady men in tactical combat gear, and solve all your problems with guns. Even the archaeological ones.
As such, it’s a crying shame that Nate “Indiana Croft” Drake, his elderly best friend, his wife and (spoilers) his brother he thought was dead this whole time but inexplicably has never mentioned, have never adventured over onto PC.
Seriously, though, some of the pirate jungle environments in Uncharted 4 are really bloody lovely. Crank that baby up to eleven.
Blood & Truth

Video Matthew: It’s rare to see publishers throw considerable time and money behind VR games, which makes it a shame when flashier projects remain exclusive to one headset: a niche within a niche. This is the case with SIE London Studio’s gangster romp, Blood & Truth, a PSVR shooting gallery that whips you from Guy Ritchie-ish monologues to army flashbacks and high rise shootouts that even Michael Bay would call a ‘bit much’.
It looks fantastic – I’ve not played it myself, as the PSVR is up in the loft and scared there might be rats up there. But I’ve watched breathless YouTubers ducking up giant crane arms as they smash through skyscrapers, or enjoying a pocket of bullet time to pop hoodlums as they fly through the air. It can only be made better by shifting to the more reliable VR headsets on PC. PSVR relies on the spotty view cone of the PlayStation camera (which is why I banished to the rat kingdom in the first place).
VR can feel embattled at the best of times, so don’t divide the troops with further tribalism. Get Blood & Truth on PC now. Or send Rentokil to my house. Preferably the former.
The Last Of Us

Video Matthew: I’ll always remember working on Official Nintendo Magazine and hearing the gang at CVG talking in a hushed reverence about how The Last Of Us had made another magazine editor cry in its opening 20 minutes. As someone who weeps at stupid things all the time – Smallville, Cheers, Speed Racer – I feel sympathy with the anonymous bawler, but must admit that I felt this aspect of the game, that it was this grand emotional gauntlet, was always a bit oversold. I mean, it has several puzzles where you have to move ladders around. Too many Homebase flashbacks to loosen my tear ducts.
But if it didn’t squeeze the salt from my eyes, it managed to work my jaw: clenching when I heard the tell-tale clicking of the Infected; grinning at the (initially) playful snatches of banter between heroes; gawping at the next post-apocalyptic vista hidden round each corner. Most importantly, my gob never had a chance to start fidgeting or contemplating snacks: it’s a supremely well paced game, tossing in new locations, revelations, mechanical quirks or set pieces every few minutes, for a solid 15 hours. It’s a rough journey, but one so smoothly delivered that I would happily take it again.

Those are our picks, but there are no doubt more games that belong on PC among Sony’s four generations of consoles – and maybe a couple to be found on the PSP and the Vita, too. Let us know what we’re missing in the comments below.

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Elder Scrolls Online players will head to Skyrim to vanquish vampires

Elder Scrolls Online players will head to Skyrim to vanquish vampires

The Elder Scrolls Online players will be heading to Skyrim this spring to deal with a pesky vampire problem.

Vampires are causing problems in western Skyrim, and it will be up to The Elder Scrolls Online players to deal with the menace.
Coming in June, the Greymoor expansion will take you to the land of the ice and snow and the midnight sun where the hot springs flow. Okay, maybe there isn’t a midnight sun or any hot springs – that we know of – but you get my reference.
One of the locations you will visit in the expansion is Blackreach, a large Dwemer city located in a massive underground cavern. This area is expanded from what you may have played in Skyrim, and while underground, you will fight monsters led by a Vampire Lord and also unlock the secrets to the year-long “Dark Heart of Skyrim” storyline.
The Dark Heart of Skyrim is a year-long interconnected adventure that will span four updates:  the free prologue quest, Harrowstorm DLC dungeon pack, the Greymoor Chapter, the August DLC dungeon pack, and the November Story DLC.

You can also expect new world events and gameplay systems with the updates. The Greymoor chapter will find you group up with other players as you did with dragon attacks, to take on the magical Harrowstorms terrorizing the land.
Additionally, you will travel all over Tamriel to recover lost artifacts with the new Antiquities system which will help you uncover the land’s hidden history while unlocking all sorts of neat rewards.
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First teased during The Game Awards 2019, the Harrowstorm dungeon DLC will release first. It contains Icereach which is located in the Sea of Ghosts, and the Unhallowed Grave burial site. Shortly after is when you can expect the free prologue quest to open up, then the Greymoor chapter will land May 18 on PC and Mac, and June 2 on PS4 and Xbox One.

Here’s more on Greymoor:

A gigantic new zone, Western Skyrim, and within it, the deep and dark Blackreach cavern. Combined, this is ESO’s largest zone yet.
An epic main story quest line with around 30 hours of new adventures that ties into the Dark Heart of Skyrim year-long adventure, plus tons of new side quests and exploration
Antiquities: this new system features two skill lines and will challenge players to travel beyond Western Skyrim and across Tamriel to recover lost artifacts to uncover the world’s hidden history and unlock powerful and fun rewards for all types of players
A challenging new 12-player Trial: Kyne’s Aegis
New World Events: Harrowstorms
A vast amount of unique Delves, Public Dungeons, and standalone quests, as well as a host of performance updates and quality-of-life improvements

Lots to look forward to.

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Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot Release Date and Everything You Need To Know | Green Man Gaming

Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot Release Date and Everything You Need To Know | Green Man Gaming

Maybe you’re wondering about the Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot release date, maybe it’s just what platforms it’s coming to, and maybe you just want to know which characters will be making an appearance. No matter what the questions you have are, you’ve come to the right place. We’re going to break down everything we know about Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot, so you can await the full release fully-armed with information. 
Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot Release Date and characters

Well, the good news is that you don’t have long to wait for this game to release, in fact, Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot releases on January 17th. It follows along with the story of the anime itself, and while we don’t know exactly how far it’ll go, we’ve seen footage showing off everything up to and including the Buu Saga, which means it could well be the entirety of the monstrous series. 
The good news is that this is the first RPG game we’ve had in a long time for the series. So, rather than just punching everyone in the face, you’ll get to find out a bit more about why, and even do things like leveling up and messing around with stats.
Not only that but the Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot characters list seems to be pretty extensive too. Not all of them are playable though, with some being support characters or NPCs. We know you get to control characters other than Goku though, so you can expect to play as a few other fan-favorites. Not only that but there is even a brand-new character who’s been designed by series creator Akira Toriyama. They look a lot like a female version of Jeice from the legendary Ginyu force. So, bright orange skin, and white hair, not only does she look the part, but she used to be a member of the Ginyu Force, before leaving because they spend too much time posing. You can see a lot of this information shown off in the Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot trailer. 
Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot PC, PS4, and Xbox One

That’s right, Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot is coming to PC, PS4 and Xbox One. Plus, they’ll all be releasing on the same day, which means you won’t have to wait around because of pesky exclusivity. Hopefully, we’ll be able to install ahead of time, which means you’ll be able to play as soon as the game unlocks. 
There have been rumours going around about how long it’ll take to beat Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot too, and it seems to be somewhere around 30-100 hours, all depending on just how much of the world you want to see. So, there should be an absurd amount of side content to find and items to collect. Some of these will upgrade your characters, while others will probably just be cosmetic. Given the size of the game, it should keep fans happy for a long time to come. Well, that’s it, that’s everything you need to know about Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot.
Check out the trailers below and head over to the Green Man Gaming Community Site to see what all our gamers have to say.
Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot Trailers

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Baldur’s Gate 3 Devs Tease “Something’s Brewing”

Baldur’s Gate 3 Devs Tease “Something’s Brewing”

A recent tweet from Baldur’s Gate 3’s official twitter account teases a possible announcement is coming this February.Baldur’s Gate 3 Devs Tease “Something’s Brewing”The latest tweet from Larian Studios, the developer behind upcoming Baldur’s Gate 3 on the official twitter account reveals that “Something’s Brewing”. The post also includes a short behind the scenes look at Baldur’s Gate 3 in the making, and shares the date 27th February 2020 which looks to be date to reveal more news. What could they be sharing in Feb? Well since the video revolves around some of what has gone into BG3, they could be ready to reveal more about the RPG, hopefully we get a look at how it’s shaping up. News has been a little quiet since the teaser trailer was revealed, with a new image unveiled in October last year.Something’s Brewing. #baldursgate3 pic.twitter.com/FMSkrYmjkl— Baldur’s Gate 3 (@baldursgate3) January 17, 2020Baldur’s Gate 3 was revealed during Google Stadia’s Connect stream during June of last year, which confirmed to the world that Larian was indeed working on the next instalment. BG3 will take place after the events of Baldur’s Gate 1 and 2. While the game will be a set of adventures to be had by all, it will reference some of what happened in previous titles and expect to see some familiar faces from the series. When we spoke to both Larian Studios and Wizards of Coast last year, it seems to be a great match as Larian worked on spiritual successor of Baldur’s Gate, Divinity Original Sin. While we did get a lot of questions answered in our one-on-one interview, we are eager to see what they have so far.To refresh yourself on the trailer you can check out it below:While we wait to see what they have to show us next month, in the mean time you can watch/read our interview with Larian and Wizards of the Coasts. You can also drop by our Baldur’s Gate 3 wiki which has all the latest info as it’s released.For more news be sure to read next Elder Scrolls Online: Greymoor Announced; Pre-Order Editions and Cyberpunk 2077 Delayed To September. To get up to speed on D&D basic be sure to check out our Baldur’s Gate III Prep: 5th Edition D&D – Abilities & The D20. Avid PC gamer and Twitch streamer. Loves online multi-player games and believes games should have amazing storylines not just great graphics. View my other posts

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World of Horror, a creepy 1-bit style horror RPG, will release next month

World of Horror, a creepy 1-bit style horror RPG, will release next month

(Image credit: panstasz)World of Horror is a gorgeous horror RPG with an art style inspired by manga artist Junji Ito. Presented in an austere 1-bit aesthetic (think The Return of Obra Dinn), it’s a card-oriented RPG with roguelite elements, turn-based combat, puzzles, choice driven scenarios… basically, it seems to be a lot of things, and it’s the game I’m most excited to play in early 2020.”The Old Gods are reawakening, clawing their way back into a world that’s spiraling into a mysterious madness,” so reads the Steam description. “In a small, seaside town of Japan, the population’s sanity is dwindling and otherworldly, grotesque creatures terrorize those who call the place home. In World of Horror, it’s the end of the world and the only solution is to confront the terror reigning over the apocalypse.”Developed by Pawel Kozminski aka panstasz, the game also features writing by Cassandra Khaw, best know for work on Wasteland 3 and Sunless Skies, as well as the novel Hammers on Bone. It’ll launch into Early Access on February 20 with five playable characters and ten mysteries. When the game launches proper later in the year it’ll get more characters, mysteries and events. If you’re desperate to check it out sooner, there’s currently a demo available on panstasz’s Itch page.Check out the new trailer:

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Horizon: Zero Dawn may reportedly be heading to PC this year

Horizon: Zero Dawn may reportedly be heading to PC this year

Like many of you, I’ve never felt the impact of a steel bow pierce cyborg velociraptor flesh. I’ve never climbed one of Horizon: Zero Dawn‘s whopping great brontosaurus with a flying saucer for a head. No, I’ve only watched our oft-absent PlayStation-owning flatmate steal through the tall grass, watching from the doorway, thinking “cor, that looks alright.”
Horizon: Zero Dawn was going to be one of those nifty-looking console games I’d begrudgingly accepted I’d never play. But that might not be the case for much longer. Earlier today, Kotaku reported that Guerrilla Games’ open-world dino-hunter could appear on PC as soon as this year, according to three anonymous sources “familiar with Sony’s plans”.
Of course, Sony has yet to make an official statement on the matter. Right now, I recommend taking all this with a pinch of salt.
For those not in the know – Horizon: Zero Dawn is a 2017 open-world romp for the PlayStation 4. It’s the future, humanity’s starting over from scratch in insular tribes, and there’s a nasty bunch of cyborg dinosaurs trotting all over the shop, acting like they own the place. With techno-tribal matriarchal societies and trap-based hunting, there’s some proper neat stuff lurking under more familiar open-world trappings.
Sources told Kotaku they “expect to see the game on both Steam and the Epic Games Store when it launches”, even if those stores haven’t been entirely confirmed. The report also claims there’s good incentive to port it – a PC port would be an opportunity for Guerrilla to “show off [their] technical chops”, offering a version of Horizon that isn’t capped at 30 frames-per-second. That’s a fair bet – it’s a gorgeous looking thing, even if it brings Sony’s big electric rhombus to a crawl.
It’s not an impossible suggestion. Sony have loosened up with the PC ports lately, with some venerable PlayStation exclusive developers finding a home on PC. For better or worse, delightfully dislikeable Quantic Dreams titles like Detroit: Become Human, Heavy Rain and Beyond: Two Souls have made their way to PC. Meanwhile, Kojima Productions’ star-studded walk ’em up Death Stranding is due for delivery later this year.
But as Kotaku note, Guerrilla Games are a different beast entirely, being wholly owned by Sony. Horizon heading to PC would be a notable shift in strategy for the company. Sony haven’t released a first-party game funded and developed by the publisher outside of the PlayStation platform since it began in 1994 – ignoring PC-exclusive MMO efforts like EverQuest. It would also be Guerrilla’s first non-PlayStation game since they were acquired by Sony 15 years ago.
The times, though, they are a-changing. Xbox have embraced the cold, LED-tinted grasp of the home computer in recent years, extending Game Pass to PC and putting all of the Halos on Steam.
Whether Sony are starting to feel the pressure or not, the prospect of some PC-powered raptor hunting is fine by me. Of course, this could all be wishful rumour and nonsense. We’ll keep you posted.

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